Saturday, October 14, 2017

Monica Chalabi

I Want My 2.3 Bonus Years

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Photo
Credit Mona Chalabi
If I could prolong my time as a young adult by, say, 2.3 years, here is a list of things I would like to do:
• Go to more parties. Preferably wild parties that I can think about, years later, at mild parties.
• Get fit (i.e., get at least one ab before I die). This, I’m told, is easier to achieve when you’re young.
• Have more romantic partners. Preferably ones with abs.
• Get a bit higher up the career ladder a bit earlier on. That would probably boost my earnings, giving me more financial security. I could use that money to go to more parties, get a membership to a fancy gym and maybe even meet a romantic partner on the ab machines.
Most men who date women don’t fantasize about what they would do if they had these bonus years, they simply get them. In two-thirds of heterosexual couples, the man is at least a year older than his partner. The average age difference is 2.3 years according to the Census Bureau.
Continue reading the main story

Continue reading the main story

Study of Attraction

Dating website OkCupid collected data showing the most attractive ages to both men and women.
I know what you’re thinking: “What’s dating got to do with your weird list?” You’re right, in theory — life doesn’t stop once you settle down, so you could complete your own 2.3-year list regardless of your relationship status. But in reality, most couples who do commit long-term end up having children, so the age gap carries over into parenthood. The average age of a new father in the United States is 31 years, compared with 26 years for a new mother.
Continue reading the main story

Typically, becoming a parent has an enormous impact on your health, your career and your ability to party. It’s already bad enough that those burdens are more likely to be shouldered by mothers than fathers. The fact that women end the childless part of our lives earlier than our male partners is just salt in the wound. And looking even farther down the line, the bigger the age difference, the more likely that it will be women who take care of their male partners in old age.
Outraged at these numbers, I send my mom a text outlining my plans to find a much younger man and redress this scourge. She replies, “Women are more mature than men.” I roll my eyes. If there is any truth to her claim, maybe it’s because men know they can settle down at a later age. Where’s the incentive to grow up before you have to? Before I can reply, I get the rest of her message: “The French president’s marriage is an exception, and it is too early to know what is next.” Harsh, Mom.
Maybe she’s right, though. I change tactics and organize a date with a fellow 30-year-old. He waits in the garden of a Brooklyn bar while I get us two spicy margaritas. When I come back, I ask him what he is looking for.
“What do you mean?”
“I mean, do you want something serious?”
Leaning back in the sunlight, he smiles and says, “Oh, no, I don’t think so. I’m not in a rush.”
Hmm. My eyes fall upon his sleeveless T-shirt. I imagine pouring my drink on it. My friend Jon tells me that these are “intrusive thoughts” and everyone has them. Which gives me permission to also imagine setting the shirt on fire. Ah, peaceful lakes! Birdsong!
I know I’m not a fun first date. I want to ask prospective partners whether they want to become parents and when — and excuse me? You haven’t given it much thought? A shrug from a man who already has a couple of gray hairs strikes me as wild arrogance.
This arrogance has, as I see it, two main causes — one, a belief that their spermatozoa are good for a very long time, indeed, and two, a belief that they could get a younger woman if they wanted to. Let me examine the evidence for each of those male beliefs; fertility first.
Your sperm is not immortal. A study that tracked 8,559 pregnancies found that “conception during a 12-month period was 30 percent less likely for men over age 40 years as compared with men younger than age 30 years.”
That research was gathered in 2000 and was one of the few studies that focused on male fertility. See, scientists have invested a lot of time in poking and prodding women to understand conception, but only a small fraction of those studies have controlled for the age of the father. In other words, all that data we have about how women in their late 30s are struggling to get pregnant doesn’t take into consideration the fact that many of those women are trying to conceive with men who are in their 40s.
Men are much less fooled when it comes to that second belief — that they could get a younger woman if they wanted to. I’m not just basing this on the Census Bureau data I cited. There’s also the information gleaned from OkCupid’s millions of preferences. The dating site’s researchers found that most conversations take place between an older man and a younger woman and in almost half of them, the age gap is at least five years.
But men might still be mistaken about just how much younger their next partner could be. That same OkCupid data shows that even when men are in their late 40s, they carry on looking at the profiles of women age 20 to 24 (women, by contrast look at older men’s profiles as they get older).
Where do 50-year-old men get this strange impression that they could date a 23-year-old? Perhaps it’s their TV screens. When New York magazine looked at the careers of 10 leading men, it found that as they aged, their onscreen love interests didn’t. Take Liam Neeson. In 1990, he appeared alongside Frances McDormand, who was five years younger than he. By the time he starred in “Third Person” in 2013, the 61-year-old Neeson’s lover was played by 29-year-old Olivia Wilde.
We are socialized into thinking that men are like wine, they get better with time. Whereas women are like cheese, they get blue veins and start to stink. At some point, I subconsciously signed up, too. I find George Clooney hot and Justin Bieber not (Clooney is 26 years older than me and Bieber is seven years younger).
Do I sound angry? Maybe, but I’m also scared. I inspect my body when I step out of the shower and I can see the skin loosening above my knees. I don’t want to choose between being single or dating a much older man with much older knees. I think, maybe, I could deal with dying if the person I love is creaking along at the same rate I am.
So, this is where I ask for help from other single women seeking men. Sign a pledge with me here today. Not of celibacy (where’s the fun in that?), but let’s end this scourge once and for all by committing to contemporaries.
I understand your reluctance. Perhaps we’ve dipped a toe in the younger male waters and been burned by the sleeveless shirts, the sheetless beds, the unbridled selfishness. But sisters! We must persevere. If not for ourselves, then for one another. I hereby swear that I will not take an eligible older man out of the dating pool — to do so would be to slap future-me in the face but it would also signal to men my age that it’s O.K., you have time. Time is too precious to donate — so don’t give away 2.3 years of it.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Two songs figure prominently in Bill McKibben's new cli-fi comic caper novel RADIO FREE VERMONT: [lyrics are here]


Two songs figure prominently in Bill McKibben's new comic cli-fi caper novel titled RADIO FREE VERMONT.


One of them is AH, MARY and here are the lyrics and the YouTube link where Grace Potter performs on the Jay Leno Show in 2007


She's skilled at the art of deception and she knows it
She's got dirty money that she plays with all the time
Yeah, she waters the garden and maybe she just likes the hoses
She puts herself just a notch above human kind
Ah, Mary
She'll bake you cookies then she'll burn your town
Ah, Mary
Ashes, ashes but she won't fall down
She's the beat of my heart
She's the shot of a gun
She'll be the end of me
And maybe everyone
Yeah, she's the beat of my heart
She's the shot of a gun
She'll be the end of me
And maybe everyone
Call her a bully, she'll blow up your whole damn playground
Pour her a drink and watch it go straight to her head
She'll take you so high up and cover her eyes as you fall down
Then in the morning, don't be surprised if you're dead
Ah, Mary
She'll

YOUTUBE LINK, words and music by Grace Potter



=========================================


The other song in the novel is ''O-o-H CHILD'' by Stan Vincent in 1970

YOUTUBE link

"O-o-h Child" was a 1970 single recorded by Chicago soul family group the Five Stairsteps and released on the Buddah label. Previously, the Five Stairsteps had had peripheral success recording in Chicago with Curtis Mayfield: when Mayfield's workload precluded his continuing to work with the group they were reassigned to Stan Vincent, an in-house producer for Buddah Records, who had recently scored a Top Ten hit with the Lou Christie single "I'm Gonna Make You Mine". Vincent wrote the song for his son, Chuck. The Five Stairsteps' debut collaboration with Vincent was originally formatted with the group's rendition of "Dear Prudence" as the A-side with Vincent's original composition "O-o-h Child" as B-side. However, "O-o-h Child" broke out in the key markets of Philadelphia and Detroit to rise as high as #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1970. the track's R&B chart impact was more muted with a #14 peak, although "O-o-h Child" is now regarded as a "soft soul" classic. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 21 song of 1970. The Five Stairsteps' only pop Top 40 hit, "O-o-h Child" would be the group's last R&B top 40 hit (they had several top 40 R&B hits in the 1960s) until 1976's "From Us to You". Included on the band's The Stairsteps album from 1970, it has become the Stairsteps' signature song and has inspired more than twenty covers since its release. The song featured various members, including lone female member and eldest sister Alohe, brothers Keni, Dennis, James, and lead singer Clarence Burke, Jr. singing in various parts of the song.





The lyrics tell the listener that "things are gonna get easier" in times of strife. The song's uplifting message helped the song to become popular among pop and rhythm and blues audiences when it was released.

LYRICS HERE

A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide! https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/a-love-letter-to-cli-fi-academics.html #CliFi #academia #genre #tenure #academics

A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide! https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/a-love-letter-to-cli-fi-academics.html #CliFi #academia #genre #tenure #academics

A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide!




by Dan Bloom


As the cli-fi literary genre gathers steam worldwide, it turns out that the major force behind its meteoric rise -- both championing cli-fi and studying it -- is academia. This is my love letter to academics worldwide, who have taken up the challenge of researching, studying and writing about cli-fi. 

Cli-Fi is where it is today largely due to the interest of hundreds academics in English-speaking nations, including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK. Among them, just to name a few here, there's Edward Rubin at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, there's Arindam Basu in New Zealand, there's Stephanie LeMenager at the University of Oregon, there's Jennifer Wicke in Virginia, there's Adeline Johns-Putra in the UK, there's Andrew Milner at Monash University in Australia, there's PhD candidate Cat Sparks in Canberra, there's Daniel Aldana Cohen in Pennsylvania, there's Axel Goodbody in Britain, there's Amitav Ghosh in Brooklyn, there's Gerry Canavan in the Midwest, there's Catriona Sandilands in Canada, there's Serpil Oppermann in Turkey, there's Elizabeth Trobaugh at Holyoke Community College (and a fellow Tufts alum), there's Terry Alan Harpold in Florida, there's Heather Sullivan at Trinity College in Texas, there's Greta Gaard at the University of Wisconsin, there's Amy Brady with a PhD from the University of Massachusetts, there's Ted Howell who earned his doctorate from Temple University, there's Dan Kahan with a deep interest in communicating climate issues, and there's Manjana Milkoreit who is teaching and writing now at Purdue University. And dozens more, more than 100, more than 500 actually. Don't forget T. Ravichandran in India, Scott Slovic in Idaho and Una Chaudhuri at New York University. And in France, Christian Chelebourg!

Academics all. Part of a worldwide movement among academics studying and promoting the literary genre of cli-fi since 2010, some even earlier.

Cli-fi has become popular not because of the main newspaper and website media -- not the mainstream media like the New York Times or the Washington Post or the Boston Globe -- nor because of solitary freelance book reviewers, or literary critics or literature and science bloggers. No, the main force behind cli-fi's rise has been the global army of literary academics who have been writing papers, penning opeds and publishing books about cli-fi. It's in the air, and they are writing about it loud and clear.

So this is my love letter to academics worldwide, who often labor in obscurity and without major newspaper headlines announcing their work to the world, but who aside from their teaching duties in classrooms and workshops, take the time to delve into a new literary genre that has much to say about our literary response to global warming and climate change.

Academics are interested in cli-fi and for a very good reason. The rise of cli-fi fits into the reason why they worked hard to obtain their PhDs  and become academics in the first place. They are not beholden to the mass media or to literary gatekeepers. Academics are pioneers, seekers, philosophers, critics. They see the world through their own personal lenses, and cli-fi fits right into their very reason to be alive and living in the 21 Century. Academics are the vanguard, while most literary gatekeepers represent the rear-guard, afraid to venture out of the comfortable cubicles and challenge the status quo. I mean, why rock the boat.

But academics have a different mindset and they are not afraid to rock the boat. It's always been that way. Academics fear nothing.

So long live academics! They are championing cli-fi in a way the MSM has never done, except for a few odd articles here and there. Academics go where their interests take them, without fear or favor. Academics are trailblazers, not gatekeepers, and they are not interested in keeping the "new" out of sight and off our radar screens. Academics write nonfiction, but what they write is powerful and important, full of brilliant insights and analysis in this Age of the Anthrocene.

Academics of the world, I love you!

When I showed a preview of this oped to a friend of mine in academia who has been at the forefront of the cli-fi movement among his peers, he told me in an email: "Nice piece! Very well put. And it's great to see praise for academics."
 

This academic paper by Susanne Leikam and Julia Leyda in Europe shows exactly how welcoming the academic world has been to the rise of cli-fi and how welcoming it will remain in the future as well.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Over 100 academics worldwide have led the way in championing the rise of the cli-fi literary genre --- OPED

Over 100 academics worldwide have led the way in championing the rise of the cli-fi literary genre



 https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/academics-have-led-way-in-championing.html



#CliFi


AND


A love letter to 'cli-fi' academics worldwide!


https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/a-love-letter-to-cli-fi-academics.html




#CliFi #academia #genre #tenure #academics

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Spunky Knowsalot Knows A Lot About Bill McKibben's new comic cli-fi novel RADIO FREE VERMONT but so far he's not telling...

Is this Spunky Knowsalot?

---------------------------------------------

American climate activist Bill McKibben has entered the cli-fi world, with a debut novel titled “Radio Free Vermont.” And we have Spunky Knowsalot to thank for this 250-page seriocomic piece of writing. Who? Keep reading to find out who Spunky Knowsalot is!


Way back in 2005, McKibben was calling for novels and movies about cli-fi, and he revisited the same essay in an updated form again in 2009, also calling for cli-fi novels as he did in 2005, but it took him another 12 years to finally sit down with the help of Spunky Knowsalot to write his own comic entry in the cli-fi sweepstakes.


When he wrote the Grist essay titled ”What the warming world needs now is art, sweet art” in 2005, the cli-fi term had not yet been coined. But fast foward to 2017 and McKibben is aboard the train now, using a semi-comic novel to reach readers worldwide, as the book will be translated into 25 languages over the next several years.

So who is Spunky Knowsalot? He first surfaces on the book's dedication page where Mckibben writes: "For Spunky Knowsalot"

Starting November 7, which is the novel’s official publication date, McKibben will embark on a nationwide book tour to promote the novel, and you can expect literary critics and book reviewers and newspaper reporters to ask him about the identity of Mr Spunky Knowsalot. Who? Keep reading.

McKibben’s debut novel -- and a goood solid piece of cli-fi it is! -- follows a band of Vermont patriots who decide that their state might be better off as its own republic in the Age of Trump.

Witty, biting, and terrifyingly timely, ”Radio Free Vermont” is Bill's fictional response to the burgeoning resistance movement created by the election of Donald J. Trump in 2016. It’s cli-fi with a comic twist, as only Mckibben can twist it.

So before we end this preview, who the heck is SPUNKY KNOWSALOT? So far, Bill is not telling, his editors at Blue Rider Press are not telling, his PR people at Penguin RandonHouse Group USA are not telling, and his marketing team is not saying either.
Hint: if anyone knows the identity of Spunky Knowsalot, please leave a message in the comments section below.

Friday, October 6, 2017

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science?

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science?


SEE BLOG POST HERE


https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html




 Wisely, Villeneuve doesn’t try to do that in taking the story forward, but his smog-infested and snowy Southern California as presented here makes a strong case not for the effects of global warming, but rather global cooling. Spoiler alert: It snows in L.A. in this thing.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html

"Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html

How the New York Times covers cli-fi genre novels and movies



Recently, Liva Albeck-Ripka the New York Times looked at a few recent examples of “cli-fi” or ''clience fiction'' specifically dealing with climate change and questioned how likely these scenarios might be: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/09/how-new-york-times-covers-cli-fi-in.html

Recently, NYT reporter Melena Ryzik asked some "experts" how doom and gloom cli-fi apoca novels/movies can wake up the masses: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/nyt-asks-can-hollywood-cli-fi-movies.html


see also


How the New York Times Books Editor and the Climate Desk covers the cli-fi genre of novels and movies -- (**Hint: they don't!** ) -- https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/how-new-york-times-books-editor-and.html

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Why the NYT and BBC and MSM in general keep getting it wrong about the power of doom and gloom cli-fi movies and novels. IN FACT, they do galvanize people into action. Ask David Wallace-Wells


HELP!


needed!


 from academics keeping current with the topic of climate risk communications vs the EXPERTS who say that doom and gloom cli-fi movies and doom and gloom cli-fi novels are counter productive and turn readers and viewers OFF and make them feel helpless and blue




, .....and this EXPERT advice is backed up, apparently, by some studies by social scientists and climate scientists with TEENS in the UK and elsewhere that say that doom and gloom novels and movies are BAD for getting people to be more aware of the issues and to even take action. I believe that this is all BULLSHIT, pardon my French, and I am open to any comments otherwise, but I am tired of the NYT and Guardian and BBC and other MSM trotting out the old tired same old same old "alleged study" that proves that doom and gloom novels are the wrong way to go. This study does not exist. There was some study a few years ago that studied TEENAGERS in the UK, not adutls, TEENS, and asking them what they felt about doom and gloom stories, etc.
Well, teens are not the intended audience for adult cli-fi novels and movies. !!! So this study is flawed and BS and all the so-called EXPERTS with PHDs at Yale and Harvard and Princeton are used by the NYT to prove this hypothesis which is wrong and has never been proven.
So....can anyone point me to this so-called expert study that says doom and gloom is not the way to go? Link? There are several so-called studies. they are all BS. I want to find the links in order to tell my contacts in the MSM that they are barking up the wrong tree and that doom and gloom novels and movies are just as good as utopian cli-fi novels. It's all up to the readers and viewers.
In other words, "cultural values, literary values, literary input, not scientific knowledge, actually shape global warming views, more and more,'' as a study by Prof Dan Kahan at Yale from 2012 indicates.
So can you show me that STUDY that proves that doom and gloom turns teens off and makes them blue and depressed rather than pushing them to take action.? I believe deeply that doom and gloom ALSO has the power to push people to take action and to take up and be woke. Utopian novels too. Both.
Recently, the NYT did another cli-fi bashing article quotes severeal so-called experts about who doom and gloom is bad for us. I say NO NO No. doom and gloom is realiity, along with utopian visions, too. Show me the links! THANKS.
NYT reporter Melena Ryzik, just the other day in a cli-fi article writes: ""But getting Hollywood movies about climate change made is not easy. And when they do refer to it — as did the Roland Emmerich 2004 disaster flick “The Day After Tomorrow” — they rarely do much to galvanize the public to action. Even well-intentioned filmmakers with carefully drafted cautionary tales often miss the mark, climate scientists say.''
UH, WHO ARE THESE So-called CLMATE SCIENTISTS and what do THEY know about the arts and literature and novels and movies. VERY LITTLE. The NYT should ask writers and movelists and literary critics to answer this question not govt grand funded PHD guys with their heads in the PHD sands, doing study after study, and never once READING A NOVEL: or seeing a movie. IN FACT, cli-fi movies and novels do wake up people and do galvanize people inmto action, That is how i got into the work! Doom and gloom doesn't scare me. And i love utopian stuff too. But lets stop this MSM nonsense that doom and gloom novels turn people off. They don't. they wake them up.
NYT again here: ''And when climate change is depicted on screen, it’s often in an onslaught of fire and brimstone, an apocalyptic vision that hardly leaves room for a hopeful human response.
That, climate researchers and social scientists say, is exactly the wrong message to give.''
HOW does Melena Ryszik a socity reporter and red carpet gossip reporter know this? She doesn't. But she repeats this stuff over and over again. So I want so links to show her otherwise.
MORE from NYT article: “Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, a professor at the University of Michigan who is the author of “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.”
REPoRTER ADDS: But that is just the kind of high-stakes film that Hollywood loves to produce — like “The Day After Tomorrow,” which depicted New York City as a frozen dystopian landscape. Or “Geostorm,” due Oct. 20, in which the climate goes apocalyptically haywire, thanks to satellites that malfunction.
REPORTER ADDS this BS: Copious research shows that this kind of dystopian framing backfires, driving people further into denial and helplessness; instead of acting, they freeze.
Melena did say....''One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is ....that climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi is growing.''
FINALLY! and Melena concluded her article -- ''So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”
“We have to touch people’s hearts on this,” he said. “It’s critical.”






SEE ANTHONY WATTS frist AND ANDREW FREEDMAN second LINKS HERE:


see text and links here -- ''Finally, recognition that doom and gloom, hell and high water, and all that... really aren't effective, and people are getting "climate fatigue" from all that sort of senseless hype.'' says rightwing climate denialist who is not an academic or a scientist but a mere weatherman. -- https://wattsupwiththat.com/.../doomsday-messages-about.../ QUOTE: *****''Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.

“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.

But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.''



https://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/11/19/doomsday-messages-about-global-warming-can-backfire-new-study-shows/


Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.


Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.


email the expert at
willer@standford.edu





“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.


But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.




ANDREW FREEDMAN LINK:


Do not accept New York Mag's climate change doomsday scenario ("Studies have shown...BS)


http://mashable.com/2017/07/10/new-york-mag-climate-story-inaccurate-doomsday-scenario/#zRZEF2mztPqz


see his refrain, which the NYT copied and parrotted: STUDIES HAVE DOWN, which studies, Andrew, which studies? He doesn't link them or ID, just as NYT didnt name or ID them.


''All of this is scary. However, climate scientists nearly universally say that there is still time to avert the worst consequences of global warming, and that this message needs to be driven home again and again in order to encourage leaders to act. Doom and gloom only leads to fear and paralysis, studies have shown.''







Monday, October 2, 2017

NYT asks: ''Can Hollywood 'Cli-Fi' Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?''

UPDATE "Blade Runner 2049" is it about global warming or global cooling? Great movie, bad science? https://thefutureofreading101.blogspot.tw/2017/10/blade-runner-2049-is-about-global_6.html




NYT asks: ''Can Hollywood 'Cli-Fi' Movies About Climate Change Make a Difference?''

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/02/movies/mother-darren-aronofsky-climate-change.html





EXCERPT:


see also:
Recently, Liva Albeck-Ripka the New York Times looked at a few recent examples of “cli-fi” or ''clience fiction'' specifically dealing with climate change and questioned how likely these scenarios might be: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/09/how-new-york-times-covers-cli-fi-in.html

Recently, NYT reporter Melena Ryzik asked some "experts" how doom and gloom cli-fi apoca novels/movies can wake up the masse: https://cli-fi-books.blogspot.tw/2017/10/nyt-asks-can-hollywood-cli-fi-movies.html




but first read this:


HELP from academics keeping current with the topic of climate risk communications vs the EXPERTS who say that doom and gloom cli-fi movies and doom and gloom cli-fi novels are counter productive and turn readers and viewers OFF and make them feel helpless and blue, and this EXPERTP advice is backed up, apparently, by some studies by social scientists and climate scientists with TEENS in the UK and elsewhere that say that doom and gloom novels and movies are BAD for getting people to be more aware of the issues and to even take action. I believe that this is all BULLSHIT, pardon my French, and I am open to any comments otherwise, but I am tired of the NYT and Guardian and BBC and other MSM trotting out the old tired same old same old "alleged study" that proves that doom and gloom novels are the wrong way to go. This study does not exist. There was some study a few years ago that studied TEENAGERS in the UK, not aduts, TEENS, and asking them what they felt about doom and gloom stories, etc.
Well, teens are not the intended audience for adult cli-fi novels and movies. !!! So this study is flawed and BS and all the so-called EXPERTS with PHDs at Yale and Harvard and Princeton are used by the NYT to prove this hypothesis which is wrong and has never been proven.
So....can anyone point me to this so-called expert study that says doom and gloom is not the way to go? Link? There are several so-called studies. they are all BS. I want to find the links in order to tell my contacts in the MSM that they are barking up the wrong tree and that doom and gloom novels and movies are just as good as utopian cli-fi novels. It's all up to the readers and viewers.
In other words, "cultural values, literary values, literary input, not scientific knowledge, actually shape global warming views, more and more,'' as a study by Prof Dan Kahan at Yale from 2012 indicates.
So can you show me that STUDY that proves that doom and gloom turns teens off and makes them blue and depressed rather than pushing them to take action.? I believe deeply that doom and gloom ALSO has the power to push people to take action and to take up and be woke. Utopian novels too. Both.
Recently, the NYT did another cli-fi bashing article quotes severeal so-called experts about who doom and gloom is bad for us. I say NO NO No. doom and gloom is realiity, along with utopian visions, too. Show me the links! THANKS.
NYT reporter Melena Ryzik, just the other day in a cli-fi article writes: ""But getting Hollywood movies about climate change made is not easy. And when they do refer to it — as did the Roland Emmerich 2004 disaster flick “The Day After Tomorrow” — they rarely do much to galvanize the public to action. Even well-intentioned filmmakers with carefully drafted cautionary tales often miss the mark, climate scientists say.''
UH, WHO ARE THESE So-called CLMATE SCIENTISTS and what do THEY know about the arts and literature and novels and movies. VERY LITTLE. The NYT should ask writers and movelists and literary critics to answer this question not govt grand funded PHD guys with their heads in the PHD sands, doing study after study, and never once READING A NOVEL: or seeing a movie. IN FACT, cli-fi movies and novels do wake up people and do galvanize people inmto action, That is how i got into the work! Doom and gloom doesn't scare me. And i love utopian stuff too. But lets stop this MSM nonsense that doom and gloom novels turn people off. They don't. they wake them up.
NYT again here: ''And when climate change is depicted on screen, it’s often in an onslaught of fire and brimstone, an apocalyptic vision that hardly leaves room for a hopeful human response.
That, climate researchers and social scientists say, is exactly the wrong message to give.''
HOW does Melena Ryszik a socity reporter and red carpet gossip reporter know this? She doesn't. But she repeats this stuff over and over again. So I want so links to show her otherwise.
MORE from NYT article: “Typically, if you really want to mobilize people to act, you don’t scare the hell out of them and convince them that the situation is hopeless,” said Andrew Hoffman, a professor at the University of Michigan who is the author of “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.”
REPROTER ADDS: But that is just the kind of high-stakes film that Hollywood loves to produce — like “The Day After Tomorrow,” which depicted New York City as a frozen dystopian landscape. Or “Geostorm,” due Oct. 20, in which the climate goes apocalyptically haywire, thanks to satellites that malfunction.
REPORTER ADDS this BS: Copious research shows that this kind of dystopian framing backfires, driving people further into denial and helplessness; instead of acting, they freeze.
Melena did say....''One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is ....that climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi is growing.''
FINALLY! and Melena concluded her article -- ''So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”
“We have to touch people’s hearts on this,” he said. “It’s critical.”



One bright spot in showing environmental alarm onscreen is children’s programs, Ms. Levin said, which “work beautifully for everyday practices and overall awareness. Parents often watch with them, and they learn together.”
 
And climate change is a frequent topic of visual artists and writers, where the genre known as cli-fi  [see hot link here cli-fi] is growing.
 
 
One thing too few people do, according to Mr. Boykoff, the University of Colorado researcher, is laugh about climate change. Alexander Payne’s forthcoming “Downsizing,” in which people are shrunk to tiny versions of themselves — thereby using less resources — takes a swing at that approach.
 
Mr. Boykoff has had his students perform a comedy show about environmental destruction; a research paper on the outcome is being readied for publication. “If just scientists talking about their research and findings were successful” in motivating the public, “we’d be sorted by now,” Mr. Boykoff said. “But that’s not true. A lot of people don’t engage with these things through scientific ways of knowing. So the arts, the cultural sphere, is a really important part of this that’s underexplored so far.”
 
 
Mr. Maibach, the George Mason professor and an expert in polling on climate understanding, said the greatest problem facing climate communicators is that Americans are not talking about climate change enough — in any shape. “We call it the climate silence,” he said, “and it’s pretty profound.”
 
 
So, said Mr. Hoffman, the University of Michigan professor, we need “more movies, more TV, more music.”

SEE ANTHONY WATTS frist AND ANDREW FREEDMAN second LINKS HERE:


see text and links here -- ''Finally, recognition that doom and gloom, hell and high water, and all that... really aren't effective, and people are getting "climate fatigue" from all that sort of senseless hype.'' says rightwing climate denialist who is not an academic or a scientist but a mere weatherman. -- https://wattsupwiththat.com/.../doomsday-messages-about.../ QUOTE: *****''Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.

“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.

But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.''



https://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/11/19/doomsday-messages-about-global-warming-can-backfire-new-study-shows/


Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.


Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people’s fundamental tendency to see the world as safe, stable and fair. As a result, people may respond by discounting evidence for global warming,” said Robb Willer, UC Berkeley social psychologist and coauthor of a study to be published in the January issue of the journal Psychological Science.


email the expert at
willer@standford.edu





“The scarier the message, the more people who are committed to viewing the world as fundamentally stable and fair are motivated to deny it,” agreed Matthew Feinberg, a doctoral student in psychology and coauthor of the study.


But if scientists and advocates can communicate their findings in less apocalyptic ways, and present solutions to global warming, Willer said, most people can get past their skepticism.




ANDREW FREEDMAN LINK:


Do not accept New York Mag's climate change doomsday scenario ("Studies have shown...BS)


http://mashable.com/2017/07/10/new-york-mag-climate-story-inaccurate-doomsday-scenario/#zRZEF2mztPqz


see his refrain, which the NYT copied and parrotted: STUDIES HAVE DOWN, which studies, Andrew, which studies? He doesn't link them or ID, just as NYT didnt name or ID them.


''All of this is scary. However, climate scientists nearly universally say that there is still time to avert the worst consequences of global warming, and that this message needs to be driven home again and again in order to encourage leaders to act. Doom and gloom only leads to fear and paralysis, studies have shown.''





Sunday, October 1, 2017

A new calendar system dates October 2, 2017 instead as October 2, 75,017 -- can you get with the program?




''The Madonna of Global Warming'' (Yann Quero)
=====================
A new calendar system dates
October 2, 2017
instead as
October 2, 75,017


[Can you get with the program? Comments welcome here below in the comments section or by email.]




One of the reasons we humans today cannot wrap our heads around the real deep issues and time frames of global warming and climate change is that our calendar time frame is too limited, with all major religious calendars systems from Mosaic, Jesaic, Mohammadaic, Buddhaic, and all other religions of the past 5000 year origin dates being too limited. As everyone on this site know, it is not really 2017 now. Jesus has nothing to do with where we are now in time, and nor does Moses or Mohammed or the Buddha or anyone else from these supernatural fake religions. In fact, if we could SEE the time frame in a much longer view, maybe we could get a better sense of the dangers we are in. So I created a new calender time framing today: the date today is October 2, Year 75,017 (it's a new timeframe, try it with your friends and colleages) Why 75,000 years time frame. Think about it and ask me if you still don't get it. So. New Years this coming Janunary will be January1, Year 75,018...) 2017 does not make any sense now in the Anthropocene. AGREE? DISAGREE? Add to the conversation! -- Cheers, Dan Bloom on October 2, 75,017.....PS i kept the 017 in the new date so that future historians and archivists can match the dates of 75,017 and 75,018 and so on with the OLD DATES from before this new dating system caught on. Which could take another 2500 years but i am starting today for anyone who would like to join me. Welcome to 75,017....it's a whole new ballgame!

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Snooks Books blog post on the rise of cli-fi


''Cli-Fi'' – How Novels and Movies Can Help in the Fight Against Climate Change





We’re under climate ‘machine gun fire’, an incessant spray of popping climate-bullets which evokes from the population an endless cyber scream. There is the occasional offering of a cease fire, Al Gore’s recent ‘An Inconvenient Sequel’ and podcasts such as ‘Bionic Planet’ allow us to navigate the ‘bullet’ stricken landscape, but where else can we find a peaceful place to nurture our outlooks? We believe that fiction offers that objective space, here we explain why:




Our society is a dense web of virtual connections – a labyrinthine network of links and ties – we have created a ‘fourth dimension’ – a virtual reality where ourselves and our smartphones can leisurely elope. In this realm of multimedia, there is 24-hour non-stop-news, free enrolment for a ‘notification education’ and zingy access to all the latest research. As such, the consequences of climate change appear to be everywhere – we spin in a hurricane of shocking headlines, swim in a flood of bitesize climate tweets and sink in the rising sea of disquieting statistics. Yet, intelligent exploration and intricate discussion of our current climate seems to be nowhere – for many who find climate science and policy impenetrable and whose environmental discussion is constrained to the fly-by nature of the media – climate change remains an ethereal and gossamer concept with a fractured and distant nature.


This is where we believe cli-fi comes in – novels and movies are  special in that they can construct immersive futuristic worlds that we can experience in the present, and weave stories that empower us to look more critically at the decisions and choices we make today. Unalike the media, novels and movies give us the time and space to think, explore and fiddle with our perspectives – that’s why we believe that reading climate fiction is the perfect accompaniment to our fleeting ‘notification education’.


Importantly – unlike, the chirping, chittering quick-fire nature of the media, cli-fi with its in depth exploration, elaborate construction and intricate narratives provides us with a ‘quiet spot’ to broaden our environmental understanding and explore imagined yet potential futures. It was Sylvia Plath who once said: ‘it is in the novel that people brush their teeth’- it is this intricacy and hint of the mundane and everyday in fiction that makes climate change seem less clinical and more personal. Thus, climate fiction has the unique ability to take a global problem and weave it into the tiny grandeur of our everyday individual lives.


So – with the power of cli-fi novels and movies in mind we want to encourage people to read novels with climate change themes – many such novels are now being branded as part of the growing genre – cli-fi – which explores the possible environmental nightmares to come – using thrilling plotlines and a plethora of unique protagonists – these works imagine what a world wrecked by the consequences of global warming, rising sea levels and pollution would look like.


Climate novels can never be the solution in themselves – however their unique combination of science, humanities and activism – has the capacity to inspire and engender action. So – if you want to know what it would be like to brush your teeth in a world wrecked by climate change – go out and grab some cli-fi.


Snooks Books Suggestions:
  • Flight Behaviour by Barbara Kingsolver.
  • The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood
  • Through the Arc of the Rainforest – Karen Tei Yamashita.
  • Freedom by Jonathon Franzen
  • The Wind Up Girl & The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigulupi.
  • The Drowned World by JG Ballard
  • 10.04 by Ben Lerner
  • Salvage the Bones – Jesmyn Ward
  • Odds Against Tomorrow by Nathaniel Rich
  • White Noise by Don DeLillo
Graphic Novels:
  • Here by Richard McGuire
For Young Adults:
  • The Carbon Diaries by Saci Lloyd
  • The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi
  • Breathe by Sarah Crossan
For Children:
  • The Lorax by Dr Seuss

Friday, September 29, 2017

BLADE RUNNER 2049: a cli-fi movie for these times

Even 35 years after the release of the original Blade Runner, Ridley Scott’s cli-fi future feels like an invention modern cinema is still trying to catch up to. Other movies’ notions of nuclear-blasted dystopias or whiz-bang Jetsons kitsch seem to pale next to the haunting, soulful specificity of his vision: the Fritz Lang-meets-’40s-noir metropolis; the paranoid-android flair; the deeply un-sci-fi moments of melancholy. It was enough in some scenes just to watch the smoke curl from Sean Young’s cigarette, or follow the dust drifting through a bleached-white sunbeam.

Not that style substituted for plot — namely, the enigmatic tale, loosely adapted from a Philip K. Dick novel, of four genetically engineered humans, known as replicants, on the run from Harrison Ford’s titular hunter in an apocalyptic Los Angeles circa 2019. The big reveal (or was it?) that Ford’s Rick Deckard may also be a replicant landed in an era long before internet spoilers and subreddit deep dives. Three-plus decades later, its sequel arrives in a cone of secrecy so fiercely guarded that unwise reviewers could meet a bottle of chloroform in a dark alley just for disclosing what happens in the first five minutes. Suffice it to say that Ryan Gosling’s stoic Officer K has picked up the badge approximately where Deckard left it, and that 2049 doesn’t look all that different, aside from the obvious improvements in high-def technology. The director’s torch has also been passed, to French-Canadian Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, Arrival), who faithfully retains Scott’s dusky golds and grays and retro ’80s pastiche (K’s official police vehicle is a steel-colored DeLorean straight out of Doc Brown’s garage; the LAPD computers look like standard-issue Eastern-bloc IBMs, with a few necessary upgrades). K’s boss, played with brisk, ruthlessly tailored hauteur by Robin Wright, sends him to a remote protein farm to hunt down possible replicant Sapper (Dave Bautista, a human Humvee in coveralls and stubble). There’s more than wriggling grubs beneath the neat rows on his property — a discovery that eventually leads K to the mad blind genius Niander Wallace (a bearded and robed Jared Leto, preening like a fashion-model monk with cataracts), Wallace’s watchful assistant Luv (Sylvia Hoeks), the outer limits of both the city and his psyche, and ultimately, to Deckard himself.

Pinterest
Stephen Vaughan/ALCON ENTERTAINMENT
Villeneuve, one of the few filmmakers working today for whom the word auteur doesn’t sound like an unearned affectation, may have fallen a little too in love with his own creation; at two hours and 40 minutes, aesthetic shock and awe eventually outpace the narrative. But how could he not, when nearly every impeccably composed shot — a surreal six-handed love scene; a shimmering hologram of Elvis, hip-swiveling into eternity; a “newborn” replicant, slick with amniotic goo — feels like such a ravishing visual feast? Even when its emotions risk running as cool as its palette, 2049 reaches for, and finds, something remarkable: the elevation of mainstream moviemaking to high cli-fi art.

Dan Bloom to speak at online 'cli-fi' symposium in 2018: a preview of his remarks

PREPARED TEXT:

For me, the best of ''cli-fi'' does two things: it delivers a powerful and emotional story and it pushes the reader to wake up to the existential threat that man-made global warming poses to future generations. So good cli-fi is both a great read and a call to action, either direct or indirect. If it doesn’t wake us up, it’s just escapist entertainment. I am not interested anymore in escapism.

As Rebecca Evans put in a recent academic paper:

''Environmentalism has an intimate relationship to extrapolation; the basic project of sustainability requires at least an imaginative extension into the future one hopes to sustain. Often, this link is eagerly supplied by environmental narrative; as Brent Bellamy and Imre Szeman put it, “ecology in general has become so closely linked to narratives of the future that even to draw attention to this link between the environment and what-is-yet-to-come can seem beside the point or even tautological.”1 In the shadow of the still-unfolding event of global warming, cli-fi, or climate change fiction, has emerged as a touchstone in climate change discourse, a genre that seems capable of anticipating and articulating future prospects of a warming world.''



Energetically promoted by a global community of novelists, literary critics, book reviewers and bloggers,  the term “cli-fi” has begun to garner a great deal of critical and popular attention, with more and more texts referred to as cli-fi and that label gaining more and more credence. Cli-fi has been hailed for making otherwise-difficult-to-interpret data about the future legible to its audience; as an influential article about the genre published in Dissent in 2013 argues, by “translating graphs and scientific jargon into experience and emotion,” works of cli-fi help to “refashion myths for our age.” In other words, cli-fi is often claimed as a privileged genre for fashioning environmental futures.


 But what is cli-fi?  As Evans says: "Cli-fi is not in fact a coherent genre but rather a literary preoccupation with climate futures that draws from a wide range of popular genres. The critical response to cli-fi has thus far generically flattened the term, emphasizing its association with the realistic literary strategies commonly associated with scientific knowledge while excluding other genres. Yet a more nuanced account of cli-fi’s generic constitution reveals new aspects of the relationship between cli-fi and ecological futurity. Indeed, cli-fi’s use of multiple genres is an integral part of the way it narratively conjures the future."

So there is work to be done over the coming decades, as more and more novelists pen cli-fi novels and as more and more Hollywood producers adapt these novels for the silver screen. In fact, the power of cinema to impact viewers visually with actors and color and sound, using the magic of movies to tell a story, sometimes can eclipse the power of literature to impact readers. Think of the novel by Nevil Shute in 1957, titled ON THE BEACH, and how the 1959 movie in Hollywood reached even more people and with even more impact.

So there is a growing role for the power of cli-fi cinema to play a role in the coming decades. Hollywood producer Marshall Herskovitz is a strong proponent of cli-fi movies within the studio system, and even though he had trouble getting his own cli-fi projects greenlighted by the powers that be in Tinseltown, he remains convinced there is a future for cli-fi in the cinema world.

Last fall, in October 2017, a new cli-fi movie from Hollywood titled GEOSTORM was released worldwide, and the director, Dean Devlin, was fully aware that his labor of love was a cli-fi film and told me so in an email.

In the film, after an unprecedented series of natural disasters threatens the Earth, the world’s leaders come together to create an intricate network of satellites to control the global climate and keep everyone safe. But something goes wrong — the system built to protect the Earth attacks it, and it’s a race against the clock to uncover the real threat before a worldwide geostorm wipes out everything…and everyone along with it.

Welcome to GEOSTORM, perhaps the most important cli-fi movie of 2017. Did you see it?

''Geostorm'' starred Gerard Butler Abbie Cornish, Daniel Wu, among others, with Oscar nominees Ed Harris and Andy Garcia.

An edge-of-your-seat, heart-pounding ride for movie audiences who enjoy a ticking-clock mystery rife with conspiracy and wrapped in pure escapist fare of epic proportions, ''Geostorm'' had it all: from blistering underground infernos to desert-freezing ice storms and everything in between.

Devlin said that the idea for the story originated when his daughter, then six, asked him to explain climate change. “In the simplest way, she asked me, ‘Why can’t we just build a machine that fixes it?’ That sparked all these ideas in my mind about what would happen if we did build just such a machine. And what if something went horribly wrong? That became the ‘what if’ story—what if we wait too long to deal with extreme climate change? What if we don’t? What if we could create this amazing machine to control the weather around the entire planet? And what would we do if it went rogue?”

As the story unfolds in the film, two years have passed since the complex web of interconnected satellites—dubbed ''Dutch Boy''—went online. The years have been tranquil ones, until now. Unexplained malfunctions in the highly sophisticated system are now causing, rather than preventing, deadly weather patterns never before seen by mankind: ice and snow in the deserts of Afghanistan, smoldering under the streets of Hong Kong, and cyclones in India, to name a few.
Dutch Boy is out of control, wreaking havoc across the globe.

“Dean has a mindset that comes from working on big epics like ‘Independence Day,’ so when he put his mind to the subject of global warming, he came up with a timely twist on the genre classic by setting it against the backdrop of a political thriller and filling it with unnatural natural disasters,” said producer David Ellison. “In other words, within our story, the science is sound—it’s the people controlling it who are the problem.”

“For me, entertainment should be just that—entertaining—and not necessarily hit you over the head with a message,” Devlin said. “But I also feel that science fiction works better, has more of an impact, when you have something to say. Hopefully, we’ll take audiences on a roller coaster ride across the planet and off into space, and leave them having had a fantastic time, and maybe just a bit more curious about the world around them.”

So with the advent of more and more cli-fi novels, we are also seeing the rise of more and more cli-fi movies from Hollywood and elsewhere, even indies, and the future looks good for cli-fi as a genre to serve as both a wake up call and a form on mass entertainment. Thought-provoking cinema might help turn the tables.

Stay tuned. Stay awake. Stay woke.